Showing posts with label coding. Show all posts
Showing posts with label coding. Show all posts

Friday, 21 March 2014

Hour of Code UK - over 2 million participants so far


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On the first week of March, Hour of Code UK launched a week-long event to promote computer sciences and more importantly to get students, teachers and parents excited about coding. As of today, over 2 million participants in the UK have tried an Hour of Code.


Recap: What’s Hour of Code?

Participants of Hour of Code will learn the basic skills of computer programming in 60 minutes, through fun tutorials and interesting activities. Hour of Code is suitable for all ages and abilities, neither students nor teachers need to have any experience to use the self-guided materials that are accessible for free on the UK Hour of Code website.



Testimonials

Code.org UK and its YouTube campaign video have seen some excellent feedback from students, teachers and parents alike. Here are a few great ones:

“I just did this in class an I LOVED it” – Student

"I have NEVER, EVER seen my students so excited about learning" – Teacher

"My 3 kids came home from school yesterday yelling about the Hour of Code. My six-year-old instructing me on how to program Angry Birds, my 10-year-old boy proclaiming 'I am going to be a software engineer. It is the job I was made for. It is my DESTINY!'" – Parent

Are you interested in learning the basics of coding in just 60 minutes? Get started with Hour of Code now! 

About the Author:        
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry. 

Monday, 3 March 2014

Hour of Code launch event with Microsoft at Westminster City School


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I was lucky enough to have been invited by Avid Larizadeh to attend this morning's launch event at Westminster City School supported by Microsoft. 

Here's Avid talking about why Hour of Code is so important.



I also got the chance to speak to Microsoft's UK MD Michel Van der Bel about why he thought it was important Microsoft should support Hour of Code.




About the Author:
Robert Chapman is CEO and co-founder of Firebrand Training. He has had a varied career covering hardware, software, services, from a management, sales and technical perspective.

Friday, 28 February 2014

The Hour of Code – 3rd to 9th March 2014


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March 3th - 9th will mark the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web and what could be a better way of celebrating it then mastering the art of coding? Code.org is bringing Hour of Code to schools nationwide to get students, teachers and parents to learn the basics of coding in just one hour.

Complementing the Government’s Year of Code 2014 campaign, Hour of Code will be a fundamental part of preparing teachers and students for the curriculum changes that will cover computer science from September 2014.


In the course of Hour of Code students will be able to learn the basic skills of computer programming in 60 minutes, through fun tutorials. Suitable for all ages and abilities, neither students nor teachers need any prior experience to use the self-guided materials that are accessible for free on the UK Hour of Code website.

Don’t think coding is for techies only, watch the following video and see the likes of will.I.am from the Black Eyed Peas and basketball player, Chris Bosh talk about their experiences with coding:



For more information and taking part visit Code.org and register today! 

About the Author:
Robert Chapman is CEO and co-founder of Firebrand Training. He has had a varied career covering hardware, software, services, from a management, sales and technical perspective.

Monday, 10 February 2014

Why children should learn to code


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First of all what is code? According to the definition by Year of Code: “code is the language we use to instruct computers.”

We are living in a software-dominated world. Telephone calls go over software-controlled networks; television is delivered over the internet; people don’t buy maps anymore, they use the web; and we all shop online.

The next generation’s world will be even more online and digital. Soon, houses will be controlled with software, some medical care will be delivered over the web and even cars may drive themselves. To succeed in such a world, children must learn the basis of computational thinking.

Software is the new world language

Because software is becoming so critical and omnipresent in our lives, we have familiarise ourselves with it. Of course not every job in the future will involve programming, but it is still essential that children learn how to master computational thinking.

Computational thinking combines mathematics, logic and algorithms, and teaches you how to tackle large problems by breaking them down into a sequence of smaller, more manageable problems. But the benefits of this approach reach much further than just knowing how to code. Computational thinking is everywhere, including physics, music, engineering or medicine. It’s a skill that everyone should learn, because you’ll benefit from it, no matter what you end up working as.


In September 2014 coding will be introduced to the school timetable for every child aged 5-16 years old, making the UK the first major G20 economy in the world to implement this on a national level. This is a landmark policy change that will arm a generation of school-leavers with the skills for the 21st century.

For more information read the full article on why everychild should learn to code.

About the Author:        
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry. 

Wednesday, 18 December 2013

Learn how to code on your smartphone


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Earlier this year, Firebrand published an article, entitled “What most schools don’t teach” It discussed the great opportunities offered by learning how to code, at an early age. Well, those opportunities are getting even greater, so there is no time to waste. Especially because in a few years’ time, coding will be a basic requirement for many job roles.

To educate people, interested in coding, Codeacademy just launched a new, interactive way of getting to know the basics. It’s free, designed for all age groups and you can use it on the go. You just need to have an iPhone.

The startup and its ‘start-app’

The mission statement of the “Hour of Code” app is that in just a one-hour lesson, you can learn the basic fundamentals of coding, through a variety of activities and tutorials. 

Codecademy was founded in 2011 by Zach Sims and Ryan Bubinski. In 2012, more than 450,000 users signed up for online courses as part of the company's Code Year initiative. Although headquartered in the United States, Codeacademy has undoubtedly gone global, with now over 60% of its users located outside the US.

Co-founder Zach Sims said: "Codecademy was originally built for someone like me to learn how to code. Now, we want to help provide an easy way for people to get the programming skills they need to learn skills, start businesses, and find new jobs.”

"We're all looking to make learning as interactive and fun as possible, and to continue helping our users change the world. Most other programming instruction companies teach by using videos or text-based approaches. We think the best way to learn how to code is to learn by doing – to actually code."



How you can learn coding fundamentals

The app uses much of the free introduction material available on Codecademy.com to create five new, mobile-focused lessons that explore the foundations of code within 60 minutes. “Hour of Code” breaks down coding fundamentals into small bits and gives lesson-by-lesson guidance, to build the right foundations.

According to Codecademy co-founder Zach Sims, you can “do Codecademy online, on a walk, in transit and use that time to be productive and learn skills instead of playing games”.

In an email conversation with Gigaom’s Lauren Hockenson, Sims also said that this is only the beginning of Codecademy’s mobile ventures. The company will continue to expand the variety of courses in the "Hour of Code" app, and also work on future mobile applications.

If you’re interested in coding, download “Hour of Code” or check out our Microsoft MTA Software Development & .NET Fundamentals training course, where you'll learn the basics in just four days. 

About the Author:       
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.