Showing posts with label IT certification. Show all posts
Showing posts with label IT certification. Show all posts

Tuesday, 5 August 2014

A chance to win £100 for your thoughts

By 

Here's your chance to win an £100 Amazon voucher.

Complete our short survey on salaries in the IT sector and for just 4 minutes of your time, you could get:



  • 1 x £100 Amazon voucher
  • One of 15 Firebrand "Failure is not an Option" t-shirts

Fill in your name and email at the end of the survey to be entered into the draw. Your answers must be submitted by 12 August 2014. All responses will remain confidential and only overall results will be published.

Start the survey now to be in with a chance win an £100 Amazon voucher or an exclusive "Failure is not an Option" t-shirt!


About the Author

As part of Firebrand's global marketing team, Edward actively works to serve the IT community with news, reviews and technical how to guides. Working in the industry for almost 3 years, Edward has a wide variety of experience with Microsoft Technologies including SharePoint, Windows Server and Exchange Server. Edward is an active member of the IT community contributing to a variety of tech publications including Microsoft TechNet, Channel Pro and PC Advisor.

Friday, 25 April 2014

How to plan your career - the next five years


By 

Whether you’re working your dream job or considering a career change, one thing is certain: you must plan ahead, if you want to be successful in the long-run.

“Where do you see yourself in five years?” – is this a familiar question? Of course it is, because everyone has been asked this question at least once in their lives. Although it may seem daunting at first, planning five years ahead can make a huge (and positive) difference.

If you’re an IT professional, certifications are very likely to be essential components of your career progress. Therefore you should put great emphasis on planning your future training. Consider the following points when thinking about new qualifications:
What do you have to learn in the coming years?
  • Do you need multiple certifications?
  • Do you have expiring certifications?
  • Polish your non-technical skills
  • How can you build your network of professionals?
Set SMART goals, but first…

Climbing the career ladder will involve a significant investment of your time, effort and money. Therefore, it’s advised to treat it as a business investment and set your expectations, goals and most importantly milestones with deadlines. To ensure success, your goals have to be SMART - Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Timely.

However, it can be hard to set SMART goals without having considered the points listed above, so let’s see what you should keep in mind to come up with a great career plan.

Answer these questions to help yourself

1) What do you have to learn in the coming years?

Have you recently come across something particular that is likely to be a requirement in your field? This can be something related to new technology, an update to in-demand certifications or a completely new qualification. 

But don’t think about your current job only. Is there something you find interesting and can benefit you in the future? Think of a certification, that is not related to your current position or industry, but could kick-start your career in a new field.

You should definitely keep your eye on emerging technologies like big data or cloud computing and new certifications in these technologies. 

2) Do you need multiple certifications?

Sometimes one certification is all you need, but there can be situations when you need more to achieve your goals. Think of the ways how you could benefit from getting more certifications:
  • Get them done in one go and save time
  • Negotiate a deal/discount when you register for more than one course
  • Spend a few extra days to get a higher level cert or a combination

3) Do you have expiring certifications?

Some qualifications expire sooner than others and recertification ways differ as well. Microsoft's MCSE and MCSD certifications for example need upgrading every three years, while recertification timeframe for Cisco certs ranges from two to five years.

Not all certs require you to retrain or pass an exam in order to keep your credentials valid. Still, it's important to keep an eye on the certifications you already have, because it may be a long process to revive them. You should also look out for any retiring examinations, in case you’d need them before they stop running.

Plan ahead and you can avoid stressing out about deadlines and workload.

4) Polish your non-technical skills

When planning your career, it is important that you focus on skills that are not technically related to your job, but help you do it. Are you confident your messages are always clear and comprehensible? You would never imagine how improving your written or verbal communication could help you do your job. This is especially true if you’re a manager and you need to be certain that your employees understand what’s required of them.

Once you have identified the fields in which you need to improve, you can start thinking about the ways to do it. Do you need to attend a training course? Can you learn relevant skills on the job? But perhaps you've already got the skills you just need to perfect them.

You can develop your soft skills and get better at your job by using the resources of the National Careers Service or Mind Tools

5) How can you build your network of professionals?

Get your calendar out and circle some events where you could make new connections and exchange ideas with fellow professionals. If you’re not able to attend conferences, expos or exhibitions you should still try to network with people in your industry. The internet is full of great forums, such as Stack Exchange, Spiceworks, Microsoft TechNet or CertForums. You can also find social media groups, like CISCO CERTIFIED, or IT SECURITY EXPERT on LinkedIn and industry associations such as techUK, CompTIA or SIIA where you can get in contact with like-minded peers.

Building your network is important, but maintaining your existing one is even more so. Take a look at your contacts and make a list of those who you haven’t contacted in the last year. Give them a call; they may have heard some news you haven’t.

Plan before you plan

It may sound strange, but it makes sense. Make planning a habit, or better yet a ritual. Before you start planning, make sure that you’re away from all distractions and you can fully focus on where you want to be in the future. If you can do that, you’ll have a much easier time outlining what you want to achieve.

Create a to-do-list and include every step you need to take to reach your goal. Because training can be costly, it’s very useful to plan your budget so that you’re always on top of how much you can invest in yourself.

Last but not least, you should also consider mapping your career path so that you can refer back to it and see the progress you’ve made and how successfully you’ve coped with changes around you.

About the Author:       
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry. 

Tuesday, 7 January 2014

The hottest certifications for 2014


By 


The value of IT and Project Management certifications have immensely increased as IT security, risk management, project management or computer forensics experts are more and more in demand.

According to the European Commission "there will be a deficit of over 900,000 trained IT staff in Europe by 2015”. Firebrand compiled a list of this year’s hottest IT and Project Management certifications to help you make the most of the 100,000s of job opportunities.

CISSP - Certified Information Systems Security Professional

The CISSP is an advanced level certification for information security professionals. As a CISSP, you’ll be an expert in developing, guiding, and managing security standards, policies, and procedures within your organisation.

(ISC)2 designed and developed CISSP for experienced security professionals. To obtain this certification, you’ll need a minimum of 5-years experience in at least two of the following (ISC)2 common body of knowledge domains:
  • Access Control
  • Telecommunications and Network Security
  • Information Security Governance and Risk Management
  • Software Development Security
  • Cryptography
  • Security Architecture and Design
  • Operations Security
  • Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning
  • Legal, Regulations, Investigations and Compliance
  • Physical (Environmental) Security

The CISSP will be one of this year’s most sought after IT certifications and an overall must-have for IT security professionals.

PMP – Project Management Professional

Developed by project managers, PMP is the highest level credential offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI). The certification is designed to ensure that PMP holders possess the skills and qualifications to successfully manage all phases of a project, including:
  • Initiating
  • Planning
  • Scheduling
  • Controlling
  • Monitoring
  • Closing the project

PMP certified professionals are also experts in managing all aspects of the triple constraints – time, cost and scope.

In order to get PMP certified, credential seekers must demonstrate and prove they have the skills and knowledge required to be successful in the field of project management. Demonstrating documentations must include proof of education, projects worked on and hours spent in each of the five phases of project management.

CRISC - Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control

ISACA’s CRISC is awarded to IT professionals experienced in business and technology risk management, as well as the design, implementation, monitoring and maintenance of Information Systems Control.

As a CRISC certified professional, you’ll manage risk design and oversee response measures, monitor systems for risk, and ensure your organisation's risk management strategies are met.

Job roles for CRISC credential holders include:
  • IT Security Analyst
  • Security Engineer Architect
  • Information Assurance Program Manager
  • Senior IT Auditor

The CRISC exam covers the following domains:
  • Risk Assessment
  • Identification and Evaluation
  • Information Systems Control Monitoring and Maintenance
  • Risk Response
  • Information Systems Control Design and Implementation
  • Risk Monitoring

Since its inception in 2010, over 17,000 pros have obtained the CRISC certification.

CISM – Certified Information Security Manager

CISM, also developed by ISACA, is a top credential for IT security professionals specialising in managing, developing and overseeing information security systems or for developing best organisational security practices.

The credential targets the needs of IT security professionals with enterprise level security management responsibilities. CISM certified professionals possess advanced and proven skills in:
  • Security Risk Management
  • Program Development and Management
  • Governance, and Incident Management
  • Responding to Incidents

CISM credential holders must agree to the CISM Code of Professional Ethics, pass the examination, possess at least five years of security experience and submit a written application to qualify.

CHFI – Certified Hacking Forensic Investigator

EC-Council’s CHFI certification focuses on forensics tools, analytical techniques, and procedures involved in obtaining, maintaining, and presenting computer forensic evidence and data in a court of law.

The CHFI course covers the following topics:
  • Cyber-Crime Overview
  • Search and Seizure of Computers
  • Working with Digital Evidence
  • Incident Handling and First Responder Procedures
  • Gathering Volatile and Non-Volatile Data from a Windows Computer
  • Recovering Deleted Files and Partitions from Windows, Macintosh, and Linux Systems
  • Password Cracking
  • Log Capturing Tools and Techniques
  • Investigating Network Traffic, Wireless Attacks, Web Attacks, and E-mail Crimes

As a CHFI, you’ll be able to protect your organisation by responding promptly to any and all attacks.  

About the Author:       
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry. 

Tuesday, 18 June 2013

‘Unhackable’ Cryptography


By 


As computers get faster, and more powerful. And hackers get smarter and more sophisticated, it's getting harder to protect sensitive information transmitted over the internet.

But hacking sensitive data might become a thing of the past as researchers have almost perfected the most sophisticated way of encrypting information. Quantum cryptography - but now without the optical fibers that are usually required.

The idea was developed by Cambridge University engineers in the UK and by Toshiba’s European research laboratory. It takes everything a step closer to what is now being dubbed ‘unhackable’ and can soon be introduced into credit card transactions.

What is Quantum Cryptography?

Quantum cryptography was developed from the laws of quantum theory to create what could be uncrackable codes that can even show if they've been messed around with or snooped on. The reason it's uncrackable is because it works with the laws of quantum physics. If you try to observe a photon particle, it reacts differently as to how it would react if you were not observing it. It is rather hard to explain so I'll leave that part to an expert. Alex Filippenko explains it with the double helix experiment in the video below.



Quantum cryptography uses single photons, the smallest particles of light, in different orientations to produce a continuous binary code, or "key," for encrypting information. The rules of quantum mechanics ensure that anyone intercepting the key is detected, providing highly secure key exchange.

Cryptography
A similar technique is already being used by governments and the military but one of the issues caused by it is that the quantum keys to encode and decode the information have to be sent on single photons (particles of light) across an optical fibre separate from the line carrying the data itself. This made it extremely complicated and expensive - especially for long distances. But this has now changed.

Andrew Shields from Toshiba Research in Cambridge stated: "The requirement of separate fibres has greatly restricted the applications of quantum cryptography in the past, as unused fibres are not always available for sending the single photons, and even when they are, can be prohibitively expensive,".

"Now we have shown that the single photon and data signals can be sent using different wavelengths on the same fibre."

The Toshiba system, outlined in research published in the journal Physical Review X, still requires an advanced detector that picks up the encryption key in a time window of just 100 millionths of a micro-second, at the expected arrival time of the single photons.

The detector is able to filter out 'noise' in the fibre which is caused by data itself therefore avoiding the cost of dedicated optical fibre lines.

Previously, quantum cryptography did work on shared optical fibres but only through short distances, with low capacity rates, or with data moving only in one direction.

The researchers state that their system can move data back and forth over 50 km with the encryption.

Learn about Cryptography

Opportunities in IT security are popping up everywhere so why not take it? Get the right security certification and earn on average £50,000. Here are two certs which are highly respected, guarantee career advancement and teaches you about cryptography. Read about the top IT security certifications, what you'll learn and how much you can earn here.

About the Author:
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.

Friday, 14 June 2013

Why you need to get certified


By 


So you’re already working in a company, and you’re already in a good position… Why bother getting certified and spend all of that time out the office? Especially if you already have a college degree and have been working for a number of years for that one employer?

In a recent survey by ManageElite, it was found that the top 11 pain points when it comes to training (in order of painfulness) are:

 1.      Lack of time to conduct training

 2.      Scheduling employees for training

 3.      Training doesn't stick

 4.      Cost/budget

 5.      Trainees don't listen or pay attention

 6.      Getting manager buy-in

 7.      Upper management buy-in and support

 8.      Finding training that fits our situation

 9.      Keeping training material current

 10.     Quality of training materials

 11.     No time to research, prepare materials

But before you come to any conclusions about getting certified, here are a few points you should consider:

Market yourself by getting certified!
CISA certification ISACAYou may think you don’t need to be marketable because you’re not planning on taking a new job anytime soon. But that should make you want to prove even more that you’re at the top of your game. You must show your value to the business. Certifications help prove that that your skills are still relevant and they are a particularly unbiased indicator of your skills.

Certifications show your value!
Having the latest certifications shows that your skills are up to date and could get you in line for a promotion or for the next role. It also shows your employer that you’re a valuable member of the team and that you’re willing to learn new things. You’ll be able to make a stronger argument for the next version of a technology you want to introduce into your company.

Stay up-to-date!
Going back to an earlier point; you might have your BA, BS, MBA, etc… but just how long ago was that? Certifications are proof that you’re keeping your skills and knowledge current and up to date. You’re passing the industry’s measurement of knowledge based on their skill assessments. Nothing will make you stand out to management like taking on additional education and getting business relevant certifications, especially when they’re not required and you’re setting a new bar for the organisation.

Get hired!
In CompTIA’s Employer Perceptions of IT Training and Certification report in 2011, they found that 86% of hiring managers indicate IT certifications are a high priority during the candidate evaluation process. The report also found that eight in ten HR executives verify certifications among job candidates.  In the 2012 Microsoft Certification Program Satisfaction Study, it was found that 91% of hiring managers consider certification as part of their hiring criteria.

About the Author:
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.

Tuesday, 11 June 2013

MCSE SharePoint 2013 exam tips


By 

MCSE SharePoint 2013 logo
SharePoint 2013 is part of the new version of Office making it easier to stay connected, access files, and maintain messaging security. The MCSE SharePoint certification proves that you have expertise in helping your company organise, sync, collaborate, and share information.

Here are the top five tips to passing your MCSE SharePoint 2013 exams from Joel Jefferey - our SharePoint instructor.

Top five tips for your SharePoint 2013 exam


1. Pace yourself
You have a limited amount of time and a lot of questions to answer. Give yourself a time limit per question - and stick to it.

2. Look out for clues in later questions
Sometimes you can find two or three questions spread over the course of an exam that, when read together, can only have one logical combination of correct answers.

3. Eliminate the stupid choices
Although all question choices in the exam must be viable areas of SharePoint 2013's object model or platform, there are usually still one or two obviously incorrect choices which helps narrow down the correct answer.

4. Look out for trick questions
Sometimes Microsoft puts in choices that are more applicable to a previous version of a product or technology, but which would not work on the new platform.

5. Leave no question unanswered
There is no "negative" marking in Microsoft exams. You only accumulate points for correct answers; no additional marks are deducted for incorrect choices.

About the Author:
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.

Wednesday, 5 June 2013

Global spending for IT Security to reach £25 billion next year


By 


According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), the global spending for IT security is to reach £25billion by next year.

It has come to no surprise with the enormous rise of cyber attacks seen around the world. with unending waves of attacks that seem to get more and more difficult to deal with.  Even MI5 is battling "astonishing" levels of cyber-attacks in the UK industry and Symantec has stated in their 2011 report that they recorded thousands of hacking events every second.

Israel is a global leader in this sector and is home to around 200 companies, most of which are important players in the industry. The Israel Institute has stated that the annual export of IT Security is estimated to be worth around £1billion and is predicted to grow 10 – 15%.

Richard Anton, chairman of the British Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (BVCA) has stated that "The UK is missing a trick by not investing in more Israeli IT security - their technology is world-beating. The US has embraced it and the UK uses it well in the commercial sector but not so much in the government sector", he added that "We certainly have a need for it. Cyberwarfare is real. It's not just stuff in stories."

In a report from the Cabinet Office, British businesses have suffered about £21 billion a year from cyber crime.

In 2010, the government announced plans to allocate £650 million to cyber security as part of its four-year National Cyber Security Programme.

The never ending IT security threats continue to grow, and is having an enormous influence on the demand for security professional. IT security has become the fastest growing sector in the IT industry.

Opportunities in IT security is growing and growing so why not jump on the bandwagon? Get the right security certification and earn on average £50,000. Here are three certs which are highly respected and will guarantee advancement.


Top three security certs


1. CISSP - (ISC)2


CISSP professionals are always in demand and many businesses now require it. It’s one of the key certs employers look for to fill management-level information security positions. Having a CISSP shows that you have a strong knowledge of security concepts and methodologies. This cert is very well known in the IT security community and according to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a CISSP professional is £50,000.
  

2. Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) - EC-Council


The CEH certification from the EC-Council is widely recognised as an entry into the hacking world. As an ethical hacker aka (white hat hacker), you’d attempt to penetrate the networks or computers of the organisation you work for. Ethical hackers do this in order to help find and fix the vulnerabilities that would otherwise be exploited by "black hat" criminal hackers.

Demand for CEH professionals continues to grow with the alarming increase in cyber attacks. Organisations are looking for new ways to protect themselves and tighten their security. The CEH course and certification covers all that is needed to identify system vulnerabilities and countermeasures. According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a CEH professional is £40,000.

3. Security+ - CompTIA


Security+ is offered by the world renowned CompTIA. Having this certification shows that you have a strong understanding of security concepts, cryptography, access control, and the tools and procedures to respond to security issues. You’ll also learn about disaster recovery methods, risk management, and compliance and operational security. From the skills gained in this course, y
ou’ll be able to prevent cyber attacks, and effectively deal with security events. The Security+ cert is widely known in the industry and just like CISSP it is often a requirement for the security team - including the U.S Department of Defense’s IT department. According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a Security+ professional is £47,000.

Note, it's worth checking the links to itjobswatch.co.uk for each of the certs, as average salaries can vary over time. Read the following article to see more of the top IT security certifications: http://www.crisp360.com/news/top-5-it-security-certifications

About the Author:
Julian writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, training, certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the industry itself. Julian is the companies Digital Marketer.

Monday, 25 February 2013

Top 5 Certifications to Start Your IT Career in 2013



By 




Thinking of getting into IT? Here’s a list of the top five certifications that we think are the most effective way of entering the IT world. Once you have completed one of these, you can start your IT career, gain experience and gain higher certifications that will land you that powerful salary:

The A+ certification is considered a benchmark and stepping stone for people who want to enter the IT World. The Comptia A+ certification is the industry standard for computer support technicians. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge in installation, preventative maintenance, networking, security and troubleshooting. It is part of the certification track for corporations such as Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Cisco and Novell, and has become a requirement for their engineers. There are almost a million IT professionals worldwide who have certified in A+ since the program’s beginning in 1993. CompTIA also offers its popular Network+ certification which you can gain with the A+ in just 7 days. You'll gain the skills and knowledge necessary to configure and operate a variety of networking products. Combined, the A+ and Network+ certifications are backed by major computer hardware and software vendors, distributors, resellers and publications. According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a A+ professional is £23,500 and for a Network+ professional is £23,250.


More than 95% of companies around the world use Microsoft products and technologies. Now's your chance to be a part of it. The MTA certification is the first stepping stone for all Microsoft certifications. The MTA is part of Microsoft’s new range of certifications which are very popular. Gaining this cert offers a stepping stone onto the more powerful and respected MCSA and MCSE certifications. This year will see many companies now looking for the updated Microsoft certs, which is why many MCITP aspirants are being directed to MCSA and MCSE. Learn more about the new Microsoft certs and the paths to take here: How to become a Microsoft Certified Professional.


In a Linux Jobs report, eight in ten recruiters said that hiring a Linux talent was a priority in 2012. The popularity for Linux has not stopped growing, and will continue to grow throughout  2013. This CompTIA course provides you with the basic hardware, software, and networking skills necessary to function in an entry-level Linux role. It also offers a stepping stone to the more powerful Linux certs such as the LPI level 2 and level 3According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a LPI professional is £25,000.


4. CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate)

CCNA is a great way to enter the IT industry. But requires dedicated training and some may find it hard if they are completely new to IT. You can first take the CCENT to get more familiar with the material. Cisco certifications are world renowned and respected. Having a CCNA shows that you have the ability to setup, troubleshoot, monitor, upgrade and maintain networking hardware based on Cisco equipment. Once you gain your certification, and some experience, you can move on to more advanced certifications like CCNPAccording to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a CCNA professional is £38,500.


5. CompTIA Security+

The Security+ is one of the highest paying security certifications and again offered by the vendor neutral CompTIA. It's considered an important stepping stone for a career in IT security. It demonstrates that you have a strong knowledge of security concepts, cryptography, access control, and the tools and procedures to respond to security incidents. You’ll also learn about disaster recovery methods, risk management, and compliance and operational security. Once gained, You’ll then be able to anticipate and prevent cyber attacks, and effectively deal with security events. The Security+ cert is greatly recognised in the industry, many companies have it as a requirement including the U.S Department of Defense’s IT department. It's important to note that although this is considered an entry level cert for security, you must first have at least an A+ certification. to understand the core concepts. According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a Security+ professional is £60,000. If you want to find out more about the top IT security certifications, see our recent blog post here.


As you can see, CompTIA dominates the list as the best entry level certification provider. You can find out more about who CompTIA is in our recent blog post

Firebrand caught up with Terry Erdle, the Executive Vice President for CompTIA at the EMEA conference. He spoke to us about leveraging CompTIA programmes to educate and certify the IT workforce. Watch the full interview below where he talks about some of the new content and certifications coming out.



To embed this video copy the text in the box below:

Are there other IT certifications to consider?

If you think we missed one, let us know in the comment section below. It all depends on what sector of the industry you would like to enter. The further you go with your certifications, the more specific your skills will become. Good luck in starting your IT career in 2013.

About the Author:
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, IT training, IT certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the IT industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.

Monday, 11 February 2013

What is ITIL?




By 


ITIL FrameworkITIL is a globally recognized certification that provides you and your company with a framework of best practices to achieve quality service and avoid issues that can and often occur in IT systems.

TIL is the most widely adopted approach for IT Service Management in the world.  It helps in identifying, planning, delivering and supporting IT services to the business.

Adopting ITIL can offer you a huge range of benefits which include:

  • Improved IT services
  • Reduced costs
  • Improved customer satisfaction through a more professional approach to service delivery
  • Improved productivity
  • Improved use of skills and experience
  • Improved delivery of third party service.

It’s used by thousands of organisations around the world, including NASA, the NHS, HSBC and even Disney.

Below is a great video that gives a simple explanation of ITIL and why it is an important cert to have. It also explains the five key service cycles in ITIL.



To find out more about ITIL and how it can benefit you and your business, click here: http://www.firebrandtraining.co.uk/courses/management/ITIL_foundation/itil.asp

About the Author:
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, IT training, IT certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the IT industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.

Friday, 25 January 2013

Windows Server 2012 and how it can benefit you and your business

This video by Michael Leworthy, gives a high level look into Windows Server 2012.

Windows Server 2012 is the broadest and most scalable web and application platform which gives you the ability to build and deploy applications in the cloud, on the premise and virtually.

Millions of companies are moving to the cloud and seeing the benefits, find out how it can benefit you and your organisation:




Interested in gaining an MCSA or MCSE on Windows Server? The MCSA certification course will give you the fundamental set of skills needed to develop and manage your Windows Server environment. You'll gain all these skills - and the certification. It’s also your first step towards earning an MCSE: Server Infrastructure or MCSE: Desktop Infrastructure certification.

Wednesday, 23 January 2013

IT Security high in demand - what certs to go for



By 


It’s everywhere, we keep hearing. Cyber crime is taking over the world with unending waves of attacks that seem to get more and more difficult to deal with.  Even MI5 is battling "astonishing" levels of cyber-attacks in the UK industry and Symantec has stated in their 2011 report that they recorded thousands of hacking events every second.

The subject also came up in the ASIS / (ISC)2 Congress 2012 in Philadelphia when Janet Napolitano, the U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security, stated that there has been over 106,000 reports of cyber attacks in 2011 to the US-CERT (United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team).

What this means…

As the number of IT security threats continue to grow, the demand for those to defend against it has become ever more important. IT security has become the fastest growing sector in the IT industry.

Taking the opportunity

Opportunities in IT security are popping up everywhere so why not take it? Get the right security certification and earn on average £50,000. Here are four certs which are highly respected and will guarantee advancement.


Top four security certs




CISSP is offered by the highly respected (ISC)2 vendor. CISSP professionals are always in demand and many businesses now require it. It’s one of the key certs employers look for to fill management-level information security positions. Having a CISSP demonstrates that you have a strong understanding of security concepts as well as the specific methodologies involved.

It is very well known in the IT security community and has also become a requirement in many companies in order to join their IT security team.

According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a CISSP professional is £50,000.



CISM is offered by ISACA and is also highly sought after for IT positions. Widely recognised in organisations and government agencies.

It provides a body of knowledge for information security management, focusing mainly on information risk management. It also demonstrates to employers that the professional has a strong understanding of security governance, risk management and compliance, security program development and management, and security incident management.

According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a CISM professional is £55,000.


3. EC-Council - Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)


The CEH certification from the EC-Council is widely recognised as the entry into the hacking world. As an ethical hacker, you’d attempt to penetrate the networks or computers of the organisation you work for. Why would you do this? "White hat" ethical hackers are widely sought after to help find and fix the vulnerabilities that would otherwise be exploited by "black hat" criminal hackers.

Demand for CEH professionals continues to grow. Due to the alarming increase in cyber attacks over the past decade, organisations are looking for ways to protect themselves and tighten their security. The CEH course and certification covers all that is needed to identify system vulnerabilities and countermeasures.

According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a CEH professional is £40,000.


4. CompTIA Security+


The Security+ certification is offered by the world renowned CompTIA and is one of the highest paying security certifications. It demonstrates that you have a strong knowledge of security concepts, cryptography, access control, and the tools and procedures to respond to security incidents. You’ll also learn about disaster recovery methods, risk management, and compliance and operational security. 

Once gained, you’ll then be able to anticipate and prevent cyber attacks, and effectively deal with security events. The Security+ cert is greatly recognised in the industry, many companies have it as a requirement including the U.S Department of Defense’s IT department.

According to itjobswatch.co.uk, the average salary for a Security+ professional is £47,000.

Note, it's worth checking the links to itjobswatch.co.uk for each of the certs, as average salaries can vary over time.

About the Author:
Sarah writes for Firebrand Training on a number of IT related topics. This includes exams, IT training, , IT certification trends, project management, certification, careers advice and the IT industry itself. Sarah has 11 years of experience in the IT industry.